Offensive language in television

We can actually share it with good ethics. Obscene content is banned from the airwaves at all times. Even the children can use these language to others, it could be or would be offensive for others.

Someone who uses foul language

I prefer to hear someone pronounce a four-letter word than to see them beaten to death or killed in a TV series. It is just fashion - and a very cheap fashion at that. I also know for a fact they'll learn to swear well enough from their schoolmates anyway. Paul Birac, UK It is just fashion - and a very cheap fashion at that Robert Kidd, Australia As a relatively liberal minded young person, I am not outraged by occasional bad language on television, but at the same time, I do not think that it is necessary. High-Profile Cases Janet Jackson and Justin Timberlake had roles, whether planned or accidental, in the infamous "wardrobe malfunction" that exposed Jackson's breast during the Super Bowl in Mark B, UK As someone who has a tendency to use swear words as punctuation, it is not for me to take the moral high ground. Welcome to the real world people, people swear! Protecting children is keeping them ignorant - they will be exposed to it anyway - at school and elsewhere. Lacks serious literary, artistic, political, or scientific value: Another way to look at this standard is that works of art, political issues that address sex, and scientific research that involves sex is protected from being labeled obscene. Profanity Similar to the indecency standard, this applies to what the FCC considers to be grossly offensive language outside of community standards. Therefore it is not acceptable or it is unacceptable because I consider that it can give much negative effects. See ' Scheduling and the Watershed '. Matthew Illsley, England My personal experience of working in an environment where swearing was the norm was to swear more. By definition, an expletive is an unnecessary word, so why include them? Bad language is unacceptable on TV?

So why does the BBC frequently broadcast their so-called quality programmes complete with numerous expletives. People swear. But they will hear swearing in the real world - you can't censor that.

Ken Beach, Germany Parents, please remember that your 9-year-old probably swears as much as you do when you are not around! They can easily capture those bad words that used as expressions for them.

The most recent research of Ofcom into current attitudes to potentially offensive language and gestures on TV can be found here Related links.

Offensive language in television

They must, therefore, be edited out, bleeped or the sound dipped so that the word is completely obscured. By definition, an expletive is an unnecessary word, so why include them? Colin Wright, UK If it's in the dictionary, what's the problem? The parents can then decide what the children watch. Protecting children is a big chunk of what responsible parenting is about, and protecting their minds and emotions is just as important as physical protection, if not more so. I've always enjoyed its more casual attitude toward language. Viewers and listeners on TV or radio are not only adults but, there are some children also who are listening and watching, which this can also give a big concern to those parents.

Otherwise you'll end up like the U. It is not necessary to use bad language just to express your thoughts, insights and views. Continue Reading.

effects of using foul language

According to the FCC, three types of content—obscene, indecent, and profane—are restricted, and each is defined differently. As a parent I find the so-called watershed is no guarantee at all that my kids won't hear swearing on the television. Protecting children is a big chunk of what responsible parenting is about, and protecting their minds and emotions is just as important as physical protection, if not more so.

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Should foul language be banned from TV?