The casualties at the three battle of ypres

The casualties at the three battle of ypres

The eventual capture of what little remained of Passchendaele village by British and Canadian forces on 6 November finally gave Haig an excuse to call off the offensive and claim success. Whereas Gough favoured sweeping aggression, Plumer planned a series of small gains rather than an all-out breakthrough. After discussions with Rawlinson and Plumer and the incorporation of Haig's changes, Macmullen submitted his memorandum on 14 February. Little progress was made in October, leading Haig to call on the Canadian Forces for help. On the Baltic coast from 1 to 5 September , the Germans attacked with their strategic reserve of six divisions and captured Riga. The plan was welcomed by Haig but with some reservations, which he addressed on 6 January. For at least 24 hours, French persisted in the belief that he was attacking while his troops were barely holding their ground.

Closing stages and casualties The failure of this last attack by the Germans to break through practically closed the battle, though on November 17 Duke Albrecht made an attack on the Herentage Wood, which met with no success.

The Nivelle Offensive took place from 9 April to 9 May and failed to achieve a breakthrough. The first was delivered by the Royal Scots Fusiliers near the Menin road.

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Nivelle agreed to a proviso that if the first two parts of the operation failed to lead to a breakthrough, the operations would be stopped so that the British could move their forces north for the Flanders offensive, which Haig stressed was of great importance to the British government. They succeeded in capturing it and the ruins of Passchendaele village from the Germans. A month of fighting at Ypres cost the Germans more than , casualties, a staggering total that would ultimately pale before later actions on the Western Front. British attempts to renew the offensive over the course of the next few days were severely hampered by the onset of heavy rains, the heaviest in 30 years, which churned the Flanders lowland soil into a thick muddy swamp. Six more divisions, including a division of the Prussian Guard, were collected for a final effort to break through into Ypres. Previous fighting since had already turned the area into a barren plain, devoid of trees or vegetation, pockmarked by shell craters. The British commander Sir Douglas Haig was eager to destroy the German submarine bases on the Belgian north-east coast. The capture of the ridge was a necessary precursor to an offensive aimed at capturing Passchendaele ridge. The Allied attackers were themselves nearing exhaustion as German reserves released from the Eastern Front were poured into the ridge. Haig came under intense criticism both in , and since, for persisting with the offensive after it became clear that a breakthrough was unlikely. Needless to say, the controversy continues today; however most historians continue to question Haig's decision not to call off the offensive earlier than November, when at least a number of the core objectives had been attained, and it became clear that the French forces would remain in the field. On 6 November the British and Canadian forces finally captured what remained of Passchendaele, leading Haig to call off the offensive and claim victory.

The infantry attack began on 31 July. While the first and second battles at Ypres were attacks by the Germans against the Allied-controlled salient around Ypres—which crucially blocked any German advance to the English Channel—the third was spearheaded by the British commander in chief, Sir Douglas Haig.

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Haig, whilst recognising the urgency of this requirement, was at least as interested in finally breaking the will of the German army, which he believed was near to collapse - a faulty view that he similarly held at the height of the Somme offensive a year earlier.

Further attacks in October failed to make much progress. From why the attack was launched to how the weather led to its infamy, here is all you need to know on the controversial offensive.

Edward Bulfin. To aid in their defence the Germans made full use of mustard gas as opposed to chlorine gas in The Second Battle of Ypreswhich resulted in chemical burns.

Battle of passchendaele mud

Aftermath The British Official History recorded a total of , British Empire casualties killed, wounded and missing, during the offensive. After discussions with Rawlinson and Plumer and the incorporation of Haig's changes, Macmullen submitted his memorandum on 14 February. In preparing the latter attack, FitzClarence was killed in a burst of German rifle fire. British Prime Minister David Lloyd George was opposed to the Passchendaele offensive, and later came out highly critical of Haig's strategy and tactics in his published memoirs, but in the absence of a credible alternative to Haig he felt obliged to sanction Haig's plans. Thus, the first phase of the battle ended with the French holding the northern half of a semicircle east of Ypres and the British occupying the southern half. To aid in their defence the Germans made full use of mustard gas as opposed to chlorine gas in The Second Battle of Ypres , which resulted in chemical burns. Thoughts of outflanking the Germans were abandoned as it became clear that there was a very real danger of losing the Channel ports to a German advance. The Nivelle Offensive took place from 9 April to 9 May and failed to achieve a breakthrough. The infantry attack began on 31 July. Haig, whilst recognising the urgency of this requirement, was at least as interested in finally breaking the will of the German army, which he believed was near to collapse - a faulty view that he similarly held at the height of the Somme offensive a year earlier. The eventual capture of Passchendaele village by British and Canadian forces on 6 November finally gave Haig an excuse to call off the offensive claiming success.

For the next month, hundreds of thousands of soldiers on opposing sides attacked and counterattacked across sodden, porridge-like mud, in an open, grey landscape almost empty of buildings or natural cover, all under the relentless, harrowing rain of exploding shells, flying shrapnel, and machine-gun fire.

West of Messines Ridge is the parallel Wulverghem Spanbroekmolen Spur and on the east side, the Oosttaverne Spur, which is also parallel to the main ridge. The Third Battle of Ypres, as it became known, would begin in July.

In addition, the artillery shells that had rained down in the days prior to the attack's launch had peppered the very ground that needed to be traversed by the advancing Allied forces.

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Falkenhayn had formed a new army group, and he attempted to drive in the British front north of the Lys River.

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Battle of Passchendaele